bubbler

Death of the written word

This morning, I read in my work email that our CEO is moving his periodic company newsletter from text and graphics to video. In his words, he is “leveraging the unique energy of video.” Meanwhile, several of the blogs I enjoy reading have recently moved from text to video. I’ve struggled with the rationale of this move. Those who are moving from text to video probably have a number of reasons. Some that I can think of: 1. Illustrating your understanding of societal trends by using the “latest” abilities 2. Trying to be more dynamic in your posts with…

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Lessons from the private sector

When you leave a private sector job, all of your access to company servers, email, and other digital programs are nearly always immediately revoked. And if you have institutional knowledge that the company is afraid to lose, steps are taken to obtain that knowledge before the departure. Especially if the departure is amicable and expected. This is just standard private sector protocol. Given that, I don’t understand why President Trump revoking John Brennan’s security clearance is such a big deal. I realize that precedent is that past intelligence agency ranking members maintain their clearance so they can be consulted…

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Even when you win, you lose

A few days ago, I was on a rural highway stuck behind a person going 50 in a 55mph zone. When the opportunity arose, I attempted to pass them. But like many on the road who want to control how everyone else drives, she decided to speed up to prevent me from passing. Since my being in the other lane was keeping her foot on the pedal, and there were no oncoming cars, it still worked out in my favor. All I wanted her to do was speed up and catch us up to the cars ahead of us….

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Poor people smile

Money can’t buy happiness. You hear that a lot growing up. And then, as you get older, you often learn it the hard way. Sometimes by getting a high paying job and being miserable. Other times, because you’re happy as you can be making a below average salary. When people talk about minimum wage increases, economic policy, and the middle-to-lower class workforce, they often end up describing the poorer people they’re trying to help as miserable, uneducated, and unfulfilled. But I think people lose site of what it’s really all about. Sure, in many ways, life is easier with…

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Spatial relations

Part of being respectful of others is respecting their space. Most people do this, but I sometimes wonder if it’s regional. I’ve lived in many place in the US, and in places like the Midwest, people seem pretty aware of their surroundings. During my last visit to Up North, every time I walked, ran, or biked on the main roads, every car that passed moved over into the other lane to give me some space. It was similar living in other parts of the Midwest. Contrast that to my last time in the Pacific Northwest, where cars militantly drove…

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Selective science

The man-made global warming/climate change/ozone hole alarmists are quite adamant about claiming those who don’t agree with them are science deniers. You see, there is no debate. The consensus is that the future is certain (as it so often is), and that we are destroying the planet. The science, they say, is settled. And if you don’t believe it, you are a science denier. Funny thing, though, that these are the same people, so guided by science, who don’t believe that a person born a male is necessarily a male, and a person born a female is female. Who…

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All we are saying…

Literally not a day went by after President Trump was sworn in, and millions of people were already protesting… something. The day after inauguration, the Women’s March was the largest single day protest in US history. Since then, liberal groups like Antifa have been protesting, often violently, every chance they get. In an unprecedented move, newspaper editors around the country have banded together to all write anti-Trump articles about his statements regarding the mass media being an enemy of the state. You can’t swing a dead cat without hearing another talk show host or political commentator ripping very personally…

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What’s new in ice cream?

If you’ve been following the latest in ice cream technology, then you’ve seen Magnum’s breakthrough. In an industry that hasn’t seen much innovation in the past… ever, Magnum released a new approach. Before they put the ice cream in the pint container, they first lined it with a hardened chocolate so that when you receive it, you can either crack the sides of the container so it breaks up into the chocolate, or you can keep it solid and eat it at the end. This is a signals an end to ice cream as usual. Ever since ice cream…

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Who discovered the whale?

Whales have been around for 50 million years (which seems like a long time), but when did humans discover them? To discover a whale, they either had to be seen from shore, or people had to invent the boat and get out to see enough to see one. This question arose when I was sitting and thinking about Jonah and the whale. For someone to have written about Jonah in the stomach of the whale, they had to have known, back before Christ, that there were whales roaming about. Perhaps it was Jonah who discovered the whale? I wonder…

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1+1=…?

When London Breed was elected Mayor of San Francisco, every article I could find about it included some version of the phrase, “San Francisco’s first black African-American woman mayor.” Yeah, but will she be any good? If you look at the cities that are failing most in this country, it’s an easy exercise to look at what political philosophy has been used to address the city’s problems and how have those solutions performed? Detroit, the poster child of urban failure, has been run by the same political ideology for the past 60 years. It’s the poorest big city in…

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